August 24, 2016


Development of the British Blues and Rhythm
  --- show 52 ---   8-24-2016
Alexis Korner Memorial Concert   May 21st 1985
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So here we are, thirty-two months after we began our look into the British Blues with a show that will pretty much take us back full circle to our very first show.  It was then that we first wrote about Alexis Korner and his band Blues Incorporated.  How he had been part of the first group of players when Chris Barber assembled his four piece Skiffle group from the members of his larger Trad Jazz ensemble to play the breaks between sets, thus leading to the Skiffle craze that took over the U.K. for a couple of years.  As that fad began to wane, the Skiffle intermissions moved more to a straight Blues theme and built up an audience large enough to allow Korner to break away, along with his harmonica man Cyril Davies, and form their own group and the first Blues club.  In those days, the idea of a music club was the getting together of like-minded players and fans to discuss and play their music and eventually came to often refer to the venue where they gathered.

Throughout his career Korner had the support of Barber, who is credited for bringing to England some of the best American Blues artists of the 50s and 60s.  If not for Barber, Alexis might never have had the chance to participate in the earliest popular presentations of the American idiom by British players, an opportunity that led to him becoming the patriarch of the genre by encouraging so many artists to join him on stage and hone their skills, most notably the original Rolling Stones (Mick Jagger, Brian Jones, Charlie Watts, Keith Richard), Eric Burdon of The Animals, Long John Baldry, Paul Jones, the entire Graham Bond ensemble (Ginger Baker, Jack Bruce, Dick Heckstall-Smith and, of course, Bond himself), not to mention the multitude of players to credit the experience of being in Alexis’ audience as an eye-opening glimpse at the Blues.

All the time that his crusading for the Blues was taking place there was not enough money to get by, so Korner’s decision to get into the radio side of music as well gave him a long, successful career as an influential BBC DJ and producer.  His influence was felt up until a couple of months before his passing on New Year’s Day 1984.  Billed as Buxton ’95, what we hear today was held on Sunday, May 21st at the Palace Hotel, more than a decade after Alexis’ departure.
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Throughout the five hour long concert, the background for most of the performers was The Norman Beaker Band, Norman having been the one who conceptualized the tribute show.  Bandleader Beaker played guitar and offered vocal when appropriate and his rhythm section was made up of bass player John Price and drummer Tim Franks.  Indeed, any time there was a drummer in the entire show it was Franks and the only times Price didn’t join him was when Jack Bruce took center stage with his vocals and bass and on one more tune when Colin Hodgkinson played bass behind Chris Farlowe on Stormy Monday.  Dave Bainbridge provided the keyboards throughout, notably on the Hammond organ, except in the Mike Sanchez portion as noted later.

Jack Bruce opens up our show backed by a stripped down version of the Beaker band with Franks, Bainbridge and Beaker along with saxophonist Dick Heckstall-Smith.  They open up with a tune that goes back to Bruce and DHS’ Graham Bond ORGANization days, Neighbor Neighbor, then follow that up with four tunes Jack recorded with Cream, beginning with the Booker T. Jones and William Bell composition made famous by Albert King, Born Under a Bad Sign.  White Room, a Bruce original,  and Sittin’ on Top of the World come next, the latter originally done in the 1930s by the Mississippi Sheiks, before moving on to the natural Jack Bruce set closer, Sunshine of Your Love, co-written by Bruce and Eric Clapton.

Jack is the only one to remain onstage as Paul Jones brings his harmonicas to perform, beginning with a duet version of their own composition Sonny Boy Williamson, then Bruce departs as the previous cast of players return augmented by the slide guitar of Andrew Shelley and the additional sax of Lanni.  Paul starts off with a couple of tunes he wrote, Room and Board and Not Me, and then adds his version of Gil Scott Heron’s Blue Collar before the horn section of DHS and Lanni adds Ray Warleigh on saxophone and, on trombone, the man who is often credited as the earliest exponent of the Blues in Great Britain, Chris Barber, for the Memphis Slim classic Every Day I Have the Blues.

I don’t feel the need to say a lot about Jack Bruce, except that his career has spanned from maybe the late 50s until his recent passing.  We have previously chronicled his time in the 60s with Alexis Korner’s Blues Incorporated, The Graham Bond ORGANization, and Cream and followed much of his solo career throughout this study; definitely one of my favorite bassists and vocalists.  We also presented Paul Jones’ work with Manfred Man in the 60s and recently joined him again as a member of The Blues Band for about the last 35 years and still going strong.

Chris Farlowe was another singer whose material we presented way back, beginning with his first recordings from 1963, and then again in the seventies when he joined DHS’ band Colosseum.  I Think It’s Going To Rain Today is an a cappella number but Price plays bass on Love Me Baby and then Hodgkinson on Stormy Monday, the T-Bone Walker tune that became a signature song for Farlowe   Beaker, Franks, Bainbridge, Lanni and DHS are joined by a couple more guitarists, Mick Abrahams most notable for his time with Jethro Tull) and James Litherland as well as Pete Brown on additional percussion.

I came across the name of vocalist Brian Knight when it was mentioned that he was an employee of Cyril Davies’ auto body shop but could not locate music by his band, Blues By Six, which also featured soon-to-be Rolling Stones drummer Charlie Watts and Geoff Bradford, who was Davies’ first choice as guitarist for The All Stars.  Knight adds his slide guitar here with the guitar of his partner Toni Vines on Meet Me in the Bottom and Hard Travellin’.  I’m sorry, but I know nothing of Vines, not even gender.  There were two more numbers by the duo that did not make our cut due to time restrictions.  To wind up this acoustical set, Tony McPhee presents solo versions of classic tunes created by Blues greats Muddy Waters (I Can’t Be Satisfied), Son House (Death Letter) and John Lee Hooker (Groundhog Blues).  McPhee took the last tune’s title for the name of his 1968 group The Groundhogs and when Hooker toured England they were his choice for backup band.  We did a couple of shows with the Hogs and by the time we got done with their 1972 material it was probably the closest to psychedelic that we heard.  But long before that we were exposed to some of his earlier acoustic work as well as when he was a member of The John Dummer Band and The Brunning-Hall Sunflower Band.

I can’t tell you much about Blues Shouter, but an online write-up about the concert informs us that she was born Val Harris and later went by the stage name Connie Lush.  I will presume that the Beaker band backed up her powerful voice, along with guitarist John Lewis, for Three Hundred Pounds of Joy, one of the many songs Willie Dixon wrote for Howlin’ Wolf, and I’m pretty sure Bull Moose Jackson did the original of Big Ten Inch Record, but Don’t Play That Song is just a familiar song that I probably should be able to tell you more about, but all in all a good, strong set.

When DHS and drummer Jon Hiseman took the initiative to start Colosseum, James Litherland was the original vocalist and one of two guitar players in the group.  I believe he was gone before their second release, but he is here on his original Another Time Baby after previously being heard with Chris Farlowe.  After he steps down, The Norman Beaker Band (Franks, Price, Bainbridge, Lanni and Beaker, with Shelley replacing Litherland’s guitar) remains to take a turn in the spotlight.  They perform three of Beaker’s compositions, Cry To Me, No Reason to Believe in Me and Cross Me Off Your List.  Bainbridge steps out from behind the keyboards to make room for Mike Sanchez for the next three numbers.  Sanchez was a part of Jeff Beck’s Crazy Legs, which was a tribute album to Rockabilly star Gene Vincent, and also was a guest performer at Eric Clapton’s wedding.  His portion of the set commences with Be Careful, followed by the Lowell Fulson standard Reconsider Baby and closes with Down the Road a Piece, a tune written by Don Raye but possibly first popularized by pianist Freddie Slack with vocal by Ella Mae Morse or perhaps by Amos Milbourne, but anytime you hear it, be it by Paul Jones’ with Manfred Mann or The Rolling Stones, it’s just a great Boogie Woogie stomper.

When vocalist Dave Berry comes onstage, Lanni steps down and the band of Beaker, Franks, Price and Shelley add Bainbridge’s Hammond organ to complement Sanchez on piano.  Playing lap steel guitar, Brian Wood makes his only appearance of the concert as the ensemble performs two standards, beginning with Bobby Troup’s Route 66, first recorded in 1948 by The Nat King Cole Trio.  That is followed by a tune recorded more than a decade afterward when, in 1959, Roscoe Gordon recorded his composition of Just a Little Bit.  While it has been put out by too many artists to try to name, the late 60s version by Magic Sam may still be my all time favorite Blues track.  It only makes sense that Berry would choose two numbers that each registered simultaneously on the R&B and the Pop charts as Berry began his career as an R&B singer who transmogrified into a Pop crooner through a long and successful career.  But he never forgot his roots and when he heard about this concert he contacted Beaker and implored him to be included to show his respect for Korner.

The closing set is probably the most representative of what Korner himself was trying to put across.  Having been drafted in the late 50s, Herbie Goins served in Germany as a U.S. Army medical corpsman and wound up in England after his discharge.  Following a brief stint with Chris Barber’s band (who is heard here on trombone) the African-American Goins became the vocalist for Alexis’ Blues Incorporated between 1963 and 1965, including the recording of two LPs, Live at the Cavern and Red Hot from Alex.  In addition to Barber, the horn section has one of the sax players from Herbie’s time with Korner, Dick Heckstall-Smith, as well as Lanni, all backed by the Beaker, Franks, Price, and Bainbridge ensemble as well as guitarist Umberto Sacchi.

Herbie puts together an excellent set here, perfect to close out the show.  Even though the Blues Incorporated favorite Hoochie Coochie Man, written by Willie Dixon for Muddy Waters, sounds to me as though Goins is thanking the band and saying goodnight to the audience, I kept it as the set opener, the same way it is placed on the CD.  That is followed by Shuffle, a nice jam with the authorship credited to Beaker, before the band breaks into B.B. King’s Woke Up this Morning which, had I placed it first as I wanted to do, would have left dead air between the first two songs.

AS I mentioned, time restrictions caused the exclusion of two tracks by Knight and Vines and we also omitted a solo performance by Abrahams and a three song set by a group called the Detonators.  Zoot Money did perhaps the set that most attempted to play tunes from Korner’s repertoire (although Goins did a good job on that by picking a couple of numbers he sang while with Alexis).  Otherwise, a lot of artists wanted to show off their own stage fare.  Anyway, we had aired that Money set a long time ago but it was impressive enough as bonus tracks on one of Zoot’s discs that it led me to this three individual disc purchase.  I hope you enjoy all you hear.
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Sometime after I tried to breathe new life into this blog that I had tried briefly a few years back, I began to have one concern.  By providing as much information as I had time to put together for you online with the goal of playing as much music as I could fit on the air, was I leaving a void by omitting interesting commentary that used to enhance my earlier shows; after all, even if I had a lot more readers, the KKUP airings should be the priority.  I believe I will alter that beginning next show by maybe putting together one eighty minute CD (instead of two), maybe one or two highlighted artists about whom I will probably study in some depth here, as a compromise so I can tell you as much as I feel appropriate and pick other artists to round out the show.  I don’t know, just thinkin’. . . .  Any feedback would be appreciated.  I had a request last show for some Freddie King and he sounds like the perfect subject for our first show officially back to the normal routine
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Since it is still relatively new, I thought I’d mention that KKUP is now streaming on the internet and, while it is still in a developing stage, we have been putting out the word.  I’m not all of that good with high-tech stuff, but it seems pretty easy to access.  If you go to our website at KKUP.org you will see on the home page a strip of options immediately above the pictures of the musicians the next to the last option being LISTEN ONLINE.  By clicking this, it brings up a choice of desktop or mobile.  I can only speak for the desktop but after maybe a minute I was receiving a crystal clear feed.  As already mentioned, this is still a work in progress and we are currently limited to a finite number of listeners at any one time.  I mention this so you will be aware to turn off the application when you are not actually listening.  (I put the player in my favorites bar for the easiest of access.)  Now we can reach our listeners in Los Gatos and Palo Alto, even my family in Canada.  Let your friends elsewhere know they can now listen to your favorite station, and while they have the home page open they can check out our schedule.
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Neighbour, Neighbour
Born Under a Bad Sign
White Room
Sittin’ on Top of the World
Sunshine of Your Love
   Jack Bruce
Sonny Boy Williamson
   Jack Bruce, Paul Jones
Room and Board
Not Me
Blue Collar
Everyday I Have the Blues
   Paul Jones       56min

I Think It’s Going to Rain Today
Love Me Baby
Stormy Monday
   Chris Farlowe     12min

Meet Me in the Bottom
Hard Travellin’
   Brian Knight, Toni Vines
I Can’t Be Satisfied
Death Letter
Groundhog Blues
   Tony McPhee     17min

Three Hundred Pounds of Joy
Big Ten Inch Record
Don’t Play That Song
   Blues Shouter       12min

Another Time Baby
   James Litherland
Cry to Me
No Reason to Believe in Me
Cross Me Off Your List
   The Norman Beaker Band
Be Careful
Reconsider Baby
Down the Road Apiece
   Mike Sanchez     39min

Route 66
Just a Little Bit
   Dave Berry     6min

(I’m Your) Hoochie Coochie Man
Shuffle
I Woke Up This Morning
   Herbie Goins       21min

August 10, 2016


Development of the British Blues and Rhythm
  --- show 51 ---   8-10-2016

Dick Heckstall-Smith and Friends       2001
Dave Kelly & Paul Jones                     2004
Johnny Almond                                    2009
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For today’s airing we will feature the only two British saxophone players who are prominent in my memories and, coincidentally, both initially came to my attention through their time spent with John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers.  Dick Heckstall-Smith appeared on Mayall’s fourth US album, Bare Wires, as the Bluesbreakers employed a full time horn section.  This was shortly after DHS’s long stay with both Alexis Korner’s Blues Incorporated and The Graham Bond ORGANization.

For this 2001 album, Blues and Beyond, DHS brings together past collaborators and contemporaries in a setting under his control.  The opening tune is the only one to include drummer Jon Hiseman who was with the Bond ensemble during DHS’ last months with the band and later appeared on Mayall’s Bare Wires just before he and DHS put together Colosseum.  Also making his only appearance on this tune, Rollin’ and Tumblin’, is Paul Jones.  I can’t recall him playing with DHS previously, but his harmonica and vocals are very prominent in two other sets today.  Bass player David Hadley plays throughout the album, likewise drummer Gary Husband with two exceptions mentioned here.  For our second tune, Martin Wilde is sitting behind the drum kit and is joined on piano by John Mayall.  Guitarist Clem Clemson was a member of Colosseum and appears on all our tracks except the opener including Cruel Contradictions, which features Peter Green on lead guitar and vocal as well as harmonica.  Keyboardist Dave Moore makes his first appearance on this set closer as he does on the last three tunes of set two.  Rab McCullough is the vocalist on Millenium Blues and later plays slide guitar on set two’s closer Swamp while Eddie Martin gave us the slide guitar we heard on Rollin’ and Tumblin’.

That first set was pretty much standard Blues fare but the second DHS set takes on a little bit different mood.  To open up, we chose one of Cyril Davies favorite compositions, Spooky but Nice, from the two-plus months in the second half of 1962 when Davies and DHS were together in Blues Incorporated.  Mick Taylor pairs his slide guitar with Clemson on the number and Paul Williams guests on vocal for Twilight Shuffle.  Williams was the bass player on much of the Zoot Money stuff we heard a couple of years back.  Jack Bruce was with DHS from the Blues Incorporated days and The Bond group until he left with Baker to form Cream and he adds the vocal, but not bass, to Hidden Agenda.  In addition to playing all the saxophones throughout the album, DHS can be heard on the vocal (if you can call it that) of Swamp which also has Pete Brown adding percussion.

NOTE: At the last minute, I added Watching Your Every Move as the fourth song in the second set, making it a five song set.  The track does not include Clempson on guitar with that instrument and vocals being provided by McCullough.
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The Blues Band figured prominently in our three most recent shows and we aren’t quite done with them yet.  Today we hear from the two vocalists in the band, Paul Jones and Dave Kelly, in a couple of sets as a duet with Kelly providing acoustical guitar and Jones adding his harmonica, taken from the first of two CDs recorded under the title Live at the Ram Jam Club.  I have mentioned before that I used to consider Kelly only an acoustic guitarist and this session will let you know just how he excels at that side of the Blues.  You should know by now that if I didn’t consider this top-notch I would have found some reason to play more full-band music.
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The Johnny Almond set, our second saxophonist, is way mellower than I would normally include but, due in part to the fact that this is from a concert unavailable except to a few “insiders” and in another part because Johnny was a fixture on the British Jazz and Blues scenes since the mid-60s, we are hearing it in what I must presume to be its first radio airing yet.

Being a person who pays attention to the back of album covers, I first came across Johnny’s name as saxophonist on a couple of tunes on John Mayall’s first American LP, 1966’s Bluesbreakers with Eric Clapton, where Clapton is reading a Beano comic book on the front and, later much more prominently, on the 1969 USA Union LP.  After the USA Union album he and its guitarist, Jon Mark, put together the longstanding Mark-Almond Band.  Prior to all of this, Almond had joined Zoot Money’s Big Roll Band in 1964 and from there had gone on to The Alan Price Set.  He was often to be found jamming with Jimi Hendrix at the time Jimi was overwhelming London. 

When the Rolling Stones inquired about someone to arrange the horns for their single Honky Tonk Woman, it was Almond whom they chose.  Johnny recalled, "I was booked 12 hours a day for four days in the studio, and they didn't all show up together until the last day.  Writing the horn parts took about 20 minutes, and when we finally recorded, it was done in about one take. They supplied the food and drink, so there was a lot of partying and drinking involved when they weren't there."

Eventually Johnny moved to Los Angeles until 1987, when he and wife Ginny relocated to the Bay Area.  "I went for six months with very little work.  I ran around sitting in at clubs until word got around that I was here."  Johnny played in the San Jose Funk band Touch and Go for a while and then he met The Garage Band.  He had his horn with him one evening and asked if he could sit in.  Somewhat reluctantly, the band allowed it and was pleasantly surprised.  "He gets up and rips this blazing solo," drummer Sid Thompson recalls. "We all looked at each other like, where did this guy come from? After that, when our regular horn player couldn't make it, we'd call him up for gigs."  Thompson continued, "It's impossible not to have heard him. He played the solo on Billy Joel's 'New York State of Mind.' He played on Fleetwood Mac's 'Then Play On,' and more than a dozen albums with John Mayall. A lot of sax players have heard of him, but the average person wouldn't have a clue. He's an unknown legend."

What we hear today is a July 16th 2009 concert performed at the Kuumbwa Jazz Center in Santa Cruz.  As Johnny put it, "It all stems from the fact that I got diagnosed with terminal lung cancer.  The chemo seems to be working right now, and I seem to be doing OK, though I have a little trouble playing for a whole evening. This is a big bash to go out with a bang."  The players, I believe billed as the Garage Band, include the former keyboardist from Mark-Almond Mark Ross, drummer Greg Errico who had played with Sly and the Family Stone, longtime guitarist with Gregg Allman Robert Berry, and heading it all up, Danny Hull sharing saxophone duties as well as playing harmonica and best known for having played with the Doobie Brothers,

I must thank my friend Jim McKee, who did the sound for the show, for turning me on to a copy direct from his mixing board, but made it perfectly clear I could do nothing with it unless I got permission from Johnny’s widow Ginny and gave me her contact info.  Quite a few months back, I spent an evening with her as she turned me on to Johnny’s music which I ripped to my laptop and just generally discussed music, Johnny’s in particular.  It was originally my intention to invite her to the station when I aired this, but as time went on and I realized the whole point of this blog was to avoid a lot of chatter and fit as much music into each show as possible (I know you guys don’t tune in to hear me yammer unless it is to laugh when I make mistakes) and so I rethought that plan.  Too bad, because it would have been fun to replicate that evening.  Ginny, I wish you all the best.
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Next show, it’s one and done after a full deck of 52 shows.  It took over two and a half years to complete what equals one show for every week of a year.  I’m sure I’ll have a feeling of accomplishment and a gratitude for being able to move on and maybe no longer feeling compelled to spend so much time on these blogs.  I hope you guys have enjoyed what you’ve heard and I think you will like the live recordings we hear next.  A bit of a spoiler: three of the artists you heard today will be among the many you will hear then.
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Since it is still relatively new, I thought I’d mention that KKUP is now streaming on the internet and, while it is still in a developing stage, we have been putting out the word.  I’m not all of that good with high-tech stuff, but it seems pretty easy to access.  If you go to our website at KKUP.org you will see on the home page a strip of options immediately above the pictures of the musicians the next to the last option being LISTEN ONLINE.  By clicking this, it brings up a choice of desktop or mobile.  I can only speak for the desktop but after maybe a minute I was receiving a crystal clear feed.  As already mentioned, this is still a work in progress and we are currently limited to a finite number of listeners at any one time.  I mention this so you will be aware to turn off the application when you are not actually listening.  (I put the player in my favorites bar for the easiest of access.)  Now we can reach our listeners in Los Gatos and Palo Alto, even my family in Canada.  Let your friends elsewhere know they can now listen to your favorite station, and while they have the home page open they can check out our schedule.
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Rollin’ and Tumblin’
If You Know You Don’t Love Me
   Why in the World Don’t You Leave Me Be
Millenium Blues
Cruel Conditions
   Dick Heckstall-Smith and Friends

Statesboro Blues
Drop Down Mama
Come On In My Kitchen
Room and Board
Please See That My Grave Is Kept Clean
Stranger Blues
When the Levee Breaks
   Dave Kelly & Paul Jones

Sunflower
Cross Cut Saw
Simple Song
Pequeno Nova
Eight Miles High
What is Hip
New York State of Mind
   Johnny Almond and the Garage Band   60min

Spooky But Nice
Twilight Shuffle
Hidden Agenda
Watching Your Every Move
(Dix WWW) Stomp
   Dick Heckstall-Smith and Friends   54min total

Dust My Blues
You’re Wrong
When You’ve Got a Good Friend
Tuxedo Junction
Key to the Highway
   Dave Kelly & Paul Jones

July 27, 2016

Development of the British Blues and Rhythm
  --- show 50 ---   7-27-2016

Long John Baldry                                 1996
Gary Moore, Jack Bruce, Ginger Baker   1994
Eric Clapton                                  1994 & 1991
The Blues Band                                    2003
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These last three editions of our British Blues saga seem like it has taken forever to get around to, because they have!  I believe this show was scheduled for the second Wednesday in June but I opted instead to use the month to celebrate the Blues Marathon later that month.  I think a desire to do something different from the Brit Blues just might have had something to do with that decision.  Then a health issue caused me to miss my next two scheduled rotations and here we are.  I am okay; it was a gall bladder issue and I would have looked it up online but I figured with all the musical stuff I’d looked up it would direct me to The Gaul Stones, which is a French tribute band covering Mick Jagger and company.  Okay, that is SO not true, but each time it crosses my mind a smile also crosses my face so I thought I would throw it in.
Anyway, after 47 shows to get us through the 50s, 60s and 70s, things are going at a considerably quicker pace lately.  Our last two airings covered the 80s, overlapping into the 90s, and it takes less than a full show to cover the rest of the 90s today as our Blues Band set bumps us into 2003.  Our next show will conclude our timeline at 2009 and we’ll close up with a retrospective program I’ve had planned for almost two years now as the perfect (in my opinion, anyway) way to put it all in perspective, so let’s see if we can get through these last episodes.  It’s been fun but it’s also time to move on.  Enjoy
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We are fortunate today to start off with two of my favorite vocalists.  Preceding Jack Bruce is one of our earliest contributors, Long John Baldry, who goes all the way back to the original Blues Incorporated before Cyril Davies broke off from Alexis Korner and formed his own All Stars; After the split, Baldry performed with both ensembles as the situations arose, preferring Davies over Korner’s use of several vocalists where with Cyril, John would be the main man.
This album, Right to Sing the Blues, won a 1997 Juno Award in the category of Blues albums.  In addition to vocals, Baldry provides the 12-string guitar heard on three of the tracks.  Canadian Bluesman Colin James contributes lead guitar on the title track only but his road band is the backup for the Vancouver session, about half of the album.  Papa John King, a longtime accompanist for Baldry, adds lead or slide guitar on all the tunes.  The rest of the LP was recorded in Toronto with some more unfamiliar names, but who cares about Canadians, eh?
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After two disappointing albums with guitarist Leslie West and drummer Corky Laing of Mountain and a decent release with Robin Trower and his drummer Bill Lordan (BLT), it seems Jack Bruce hit on the right combination in creating another power trio a la Cream.  Perhaps it was teaming up once again with Cream’s drummer Ginger Baker or perhaps it was the powerful guitar provided by Gary Moore but the fit was right to make BBM’s 1994 album Around the Next Dream hit the mark, but I think you’ll agree that it succeeded.  The trio’s sound is augmented with Tommy Eyre on keyboards.
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And since Bruce and Baker were reunited, it only makes sense that the filler set for this show be Eric Clapton.  He came back to his Blues roots in fine form with a full album of nothing but in 1994 with the album From the Cradle.  I’ve always felt Clapton’s voice rang a little hollow, but for this set (especially the opening tune) it doesn’t seem to bother me.  The closing number, Watch Out, comes from his 1991 live double disc set, 24 Nights.  It is one of four tracks that had American guests as his backup (guitarists Buddy Guy and Robert Cray, pianist from Chuck Berry’s heyday Johnnie Johnson, Cray’s bass player Richard Cousins and drummer Jamie Oldaker).  As I was preparing to put this show together I found myself really disappointed because I thought these four songs would provide a good strong set.  I knew the other disc and a half were pretty much retreads of Clapton’s pop stuff but the three other Blues tunes were just too slow for the energy level I prefer.
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We’ve already heard the first three Blues Band albums recently and this jump ahead to 2003’s Few Short Lines brings us another example of why they are likely my favorite of all the discoveries I have found during this 52-episode saga, and we are not quite done with their members yet.
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Since it is still relatively new, I thought I’d mention that KKUP is now streaming on the internet and, while it is still in a developing stage, we have been putting out the word.  I’m not all of that good with high-tech stuff, but it seems pretty easy to access.  If you go to our website at KKUP.org you will see on the home page a strip of options immediately above the pictures of the musicians the next to the last option being LISTEN ONLINE.  By clicking this, it brings up a choice of desktop or mobile.  I can only speak for the desktop but after maybe a minute I was receiving a crystal clear feed.  As already mentioned, this is still a work in progress and we are currently limited to a finite number of listeners at any one time.  I mention this so you will be aware to turn off the application when you are not actually listening.  (I put the player in my favorites bar for the easiest of access.)  Now we can reach our listeners in Los Gatos and Palo Alto, even my family in Canada.  Let your friends elsewhere know they can now listen to your favorite station, and while they have the home page open they can check out our schedule.
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Right to Sing the Blues
They Raided the Joint
Easy Street
I’m Shakin’
East Virginia Blues
Midnight Hour Blues
   Long John Baldry   24min

Waiting in the Wings
City of Gold
High Cost of Loving
Can’t Fool the Blues
Glory Days
Why Does Love (Have to Go Wrong)
I Wonder Why (Are You So Mean to Me)
   BBM (Baker, Bruce, Moore)   36min

Few Short Lines
I Believe I’m in Love with You
Pay It No Mind
Suddenly I Like It
Statesboro Blues
My Toot Toot
It Take Love
Road
You Can Dance to the Blues
   The Blues Band   38min

Blues Before Sunrise
Reconsider Baby
Hoochie Coochie Man
I’m Tore Down
How Long Blues
Goin’ Away Baby
Blues Leave Me Alone
Motherless Child
Sinner’s Prayer
It Hurts Me Too
Driftin’ Blues
Watch Yourself
   Eric Clapton   41min

Work So Hard
Whoa Back Buck
It’s Too Late, Brother
Morning Dew
Midnight in Berlin
   Long John Baldry   20min

June 22, 2016


Blues Marathon pre-show     6-22-2016                                            
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Paul and I were scheduled for a fifth Wednesday this month and we agreed to move it a week ahead so we could get together and hype the 2016 Blues Marathon which begins this Friday at noon.  I’ll be taking stuff from various artist discs I put together almost a decade ago for just such occasions which means you’ll be hearing some of my favorite tunes.  I had problems copying Paul’s playlist but it is included below as best I was able to get it.  This is followed by the Marathon schedule.  Enjoy your Blues weekend.

I’ll be back next week and we’ll begin the last three episodes of our British Blues series.  If you’ve stuck with me this long, I’m sure you’ll like ‘em.
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  1
ROCK'N ROLL BOOGIE - JO JO WILLIAMS AND HIS BAND  ATOMIC - H no#  1959 Nnn(45)
2
LET'S ROLL - J. B. LENOIR  J.O.B. 112  1952 Nb12
3
EVERYBODY'S SINGING THE BLUES - FIVE DUKES OF RHYTHM  RENDEZVOUS 812  1954 (X)ah
4
LIGHTNING STRUCK THE POORHOUSE - COUSIN JOE NcouCD
5
FEEL SO BAD - ROBERT NIGHTHAWK AND HIS NIGHTHAWKS BAND  UNITED 105  1952 (N)prx214
6
RAMBLING - JOHNNY SHINES  J.O.B 116  1952 Vb12
7
ALPHABET BLUES - FREDDY MITCHELL v. BIG SHEBA  DERBY 745  c.1950 X9b
8
BACK HOME TO MAMA - BIG WALTER AND HIS COMBO  STATES 145  1955 Nsto(45)
9
EARLY MORNING BLUES - MUDDY WATERS AND HIS GUITAR  CHESS 1490  1951 Nalb
10
ROUGH TREATMENT - LITTLE HUDSON AND HIS RED DEVIL TRIO  J.O.B. 1016  1953(X)
11
EMPTY BEDROOM BLUES - SAUNDERS KING  MODERN 659  1949 Ndea(78)
12
BABY, BABY, WHAT'S WRONG - EARL GAINES v., LOUIS BROOKS AND HIS HI-TOPPERS
  EXCELLO 2063  1955 Nmar(78)
13
EYESIGHT TO THE BLIND - SONNY BOY WILLIAMSON II  TRUMPET 129  1951 X
14
FINALLY MET MY BABY - LIGHTNIN' HOPKINS & RUTH AMES  HERALD 483  1956Xmg
15
FINE JELLY BLUES - REDD FOXX WITH KENNY WATTS AND HIS JUMPIN' BUDDIES  SAVOY 631  1946 Nbou
16
A FOOL NO MORE - EDDIE HOPE AND MANNISH BOYS  MARLIN 804  1956 X
17
BLUES PAIN - LOWELL FULSOM  KENT 489  1968 Nr(45)
18
GIT TO GITTIN' BABY - WYNONIE HARRIS  KING 4774  1955 Ndea(45)
19
GOIN' BACK TO ORLEANS - JESSE AND BUZZY  SAVOY 1559  1958X
20
I'M GOIN' HOME - MYRTLE JONES  COURIER 507  1955 Xboo(78)
21
GONNA HOP ON DOWN THE LINE - RALPH WILLIS  KING 4631  1953 Ndad(78)
22
BABY, PLEASE DON'T - ROY HAWKINS  RHYTHM 122  1958 Nsto(45)
23
GOOD MORNIN' BABY - SMOKEY HOGG  EBB 127  1957(X)
24
SHE'S FINE, SHE'S MINE - BO DIDDLEY  CHECKER 819  1955 (N)r
25
GOODBYE BABY - ELMORE JAMES  FLAIR 1079  1955
26
SAVANNAH SINGS THE BLUES - SAVANNAH CHURCHILL AND THE FOUR TUNES  MANOR 1180  c.1946 Nmar
27
ALLEY SPECIAL - WRIGHT HOLMES  GOTHAM 511  1947 Nsto(78)
28
GOTTA GO BABY - JOE HILL LEWIS THE ONE MAN BAND  MODERN  839  1951 N209(78)

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FRIDAY     June 24th 2016

noon-3pm   Gil  will host live music

   1pm Rob Vye

   2pm Preacher boy 

3-6pm   "Blue Suede Dave" Stafford will continue with live music:

   3pm Chris Burkhardt

   4pm Ruth Gerson 

6-9pm   Mike the Fly

9-midnight   Kingman

SATURDAY     June 25th, 2016

midnight-3am  The Rhythm Mechanic will be exploring the Many Shades of the Blues,.

   from the Darkness of the Delta to the

       Brightest of the Bay

3-6am  Dr. J

6-9am   Tomas Montoya

9am-noon   The One Foggy-Eyed Radish  

noon-2pm  Lars Bourne

2-4pm Mark Owens

4-6pm  Radio Re

6-8pm   Jim Dandy and his Mystic Blues Knights of the El Camino

8-10   Paul Johnson and friends

10-midnight   Rhythm Doctor and friends

SUNDAY     June 26th, 2016

midnight-3am  Johnnie Cozmik

3-7am   Bobby G

7-10am   Paul Jacobs

10am-noon   The Hoochie Coochie Man (Rockin’ Rick)

noon-2pm Jim and Gratia

2pm   Jammin' Jim Farris transitions us from the recorded music to our live in-studio Blues

3pm-midnight will be live performances in the station.

3pm GG Amos

4pm Dave Gonzales and Sammy Varela

    tribute to Peter Green

5pm Pat Wilder

6[pm Gary Smith,David Barrett,Andy Just

7pm the Benton st blues band

8pm Alabama Mike 

9pm JC Smith 

10pm Big Jon Atkinson

11pm Kid Andersen, Aki Kumar and friends